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Don't Print

Dont print that email/document. Its not a request. Its a real, honest, warning. Dont do it. You must be really out of this world, or of the last millenium, or simply a silicon dimwit to use that printer instead of using it electronically.

dont_print_emailsIn the first place, you are consuming (carelessly) yet another enviromentally expensive resource. No, not the paper. The Tree (do you know how long it takes for a tree to be ready for paper manufacturing? and all those chemicals used to make it?). On the other hand, it is much easier to search an electronic catalog than manually looking up a drawer full of business requirements in hard copy. Instead of printing those comminucation emails, jira tickets, corporate bills, use case documents (and the list goes on..) - scan them / store digitally. Many of these start off as electronic documents. Use those. You can make it worth even more by using Google Desktop search or similar tools. Much worse is printing books/study material for *reference*. Are you kidding? For *reference*?? BUY that book (Bookmakers are many times envorimentally friendlier, than printing in a brand new A4 papers from staples), if you cant read it off the monitor . Again, searching is so much easier, quicker and productive, if you are looking up the digital version.

You really have to print? REALLY! Chances are you DON'T - REALLY. Look for alternatives. Make that *looking* a habit. Tell others. Stop them from using the printer. Shoot them if you need to (Ok, that - I am kidding..). If you are a manager, encourage people to go green. Use no (or minimal) paper. It saves you a ton of money. Better yet makes you a pleasant tree hugger.

If you STILL have to print (you have to read this all over again :D)-
  • Use both sides of the paper.
  • Use that paper used on only one side.
  • Make use of print preview and reduce errors.
  • Reduce font size, spacing, extra line breaks - feel victorious even if you save one page!
  • When you are done put that in a *recycle* bin.

I hope this makes you a better user of paper. If you find this a little harsher than you thought, keep that rolling everytime you go near a printer :P

Read more about this revolution
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