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Blogging in telugu

Wow.. This is wonderful.. Do you know it is as much easier to write in Telugu (or other Indian languages) in any application (not just Orkut)

Theory:

There are many ways of doing it. First try to understand how it is done. The direct way is to get yourself a Telugu keyboard (or a simulator in your OS). This way you will have a steep learning curve. This is also called Inscript. Though this is hard on your mind, its good on the output - I mean - since there will be no conversion, it is the perfect way to write in digital Telugu.

For the other not-so-professional-about-the-telugu-text-YET people (like me), There are two other easy ways. My favorite is RTS (Rice Transliteration Scheme). Another is WX. RTS is a little more standard and some what comprehensive for most phonetic languages. WX is another notation from IIIT - its much easier to learn with lesser rules. As they say - no pain no gain - WX offers lesser "Strict-ability" on achieving correct text.

Both these work on what is called as KeyMap translations. What it does is, it translates keys pressed in a sequence into lexical units and converts them to Unicode Telugu characters. Folks with familiar with the aforementioned orkut's java script feature would see the point. Well there are online tools and Installable tools too. You can quickly start writing in telugu (using RTS) from this application. Once you get a hold of RTS, which by the way is a lot of fun- You can also install this one(I dint see if this was actively supported, but the version available is good enough). Here is a detailed lookup of how RTS is KeyMapped. You can also learn more about how google offers these in its own services.

Troubleshooting:
If you have issues - You can start here.
There are some issues in Firefox that renders telugu text improperly. Here is one solution.

If you want you can get some telugu fonts here

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